Skip to main content

Undergraduate Admissions

Main Content

Pre-Seniors (9-11th Grade)

Brown-Lupton University Union building

Before Your Senior Year

It’s never too soon to start preparing yourself for college. No matter your grade level, you can begin taking steps to position yourself for admission to the school of your dreams (hint: we hear TCU is great).

Below is a timeline with links that will lead you to tips and suggestions for both students and parents. Making good choices now means better academic options later, both of which will turn into opportunities of a lifetime!

  • Meet and get acquainted with your high school counselor. Let them know what your interests are for future careers and learn what type of classes and areas of study are important in order to pursue your career goals.
  • Seek information about college nights or events when college representatives will visit your school. Collect information about the colleges of interest to you.
  • Research different college/university websites for an overview of the school regarding types of majors, location, social aspects and other areas that you feel are important when choosing a college—information can be found in your high school counselor’s office.
  • Take challenging classes that you can handle. (Pre-Advanced Placement/Advanced Placement/Honors/International Baccalaureate) Seek tutorial sessions when needed.
  • Establish good study habits and stay focused on school work, homework and school projects.
    Study Skills for High School Students
  • Seek summer enrichment programs that are college-focused or that offer activities and events related to college information and preparedness.
    Summer Camps
  • Talk with family members about financial savings plan for college.
    10 Ways to Save for College
  • Volunteer in your community.
  • Get involved in school activities that interest you.
  • Continue to meet with your high school counselor about your educational and career goals.
  • Seek information about the PSAT (Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test), SAT (Scholastic Assessment Test) and the ACT (American College Testing)– Information is available in your high school counselor’s office and/or www.collegeboard.com.
  • Seek information about college nights or events when college representatives will visit your school. Collect information about the colleges of interest to you.
  • Research different college/university websites for an overview of the school regarding types of majors, location, social aspect and other areas that you feel are important when choosing a college—information can be found in your high school counselor’s office.
  • Take challenging courses which you can handle. (Pre-Advanced/Advanced Placement/Honors/International Baccalaureate) Seek tutorial sessions when needed.
    AP Courses and Exams
  • Establish strong study habits and develop time management in order to balance school work and extracurricular activities.
  • Seek summer enrichment programs that are college-focused or that offer activities and events related to college information and preparedness.
    The Importance of Summer Learning
  • Use some of your downtime constructively by reading a book or doing crossword puzzles.
  • Get involved in school activities that interest you.
  • Volunteer in your community.
  • Talk with family members about financial savings plan for college.
    What Does A College Budget Look Like
  • If you and your family members do some traveling during spring break or summer, include a visit to a college or university.
  • Although all academic years in high school are important, junior and senior academic years are evaluated closely in college applications. Do your best in all classes.
  • Take challenging classes you can handle (AP/Honors/IB) and choose courses which will make you more competitive in your area of study (i.e., students wishing to pursue Pre-Medical, Nursing and Engineering should take classes such as Pre-Calculus/Calculus, Physics, Chemistry and Anatomy & Physiology)
  • Look into CLEP test options
    CLEP Credits are Accepted by Nearly 3000 Colleges
  • Take the Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test (PSAT) and plan and/or schedule to take the SAT (Scholastic Assessment Test) and/or the ACT (American College Test)—Seek information in your high school counselor’s office and/or www.collegeboard.com
  • Get involved in school activities/organizations and volunteer in your community in order to build your resume
  • Follow your high school procedures for meeting with your high school counselor regarding the college admission process and scholarship opportunities and financial Aid.
  • Become familiar with the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) www.fafsa.ed.gov
  • Research different colleges/universities you may be interested in applying. Get on your choice school’s mailing list so you will begin receiving updated information
    regarding areas of study and their college admission process including application and scholarship deadlines.
  • Seek mentors (school staff, family members or friends) if you feel you need help with the college admission process.
  • Attend college fairs and events when a college representative visits your school.
    National College Fairs Resource
  • Contact your assigned admission counselor at the schools of your choice as they can guide you and provide accurate information throughout the college admission process.
    Questions to Ask College Admission Counselors
  • Seek information about a choice school’s scholarship criteria and deadlines.
  • Research information for additional outside scholarships through your high school counseling office, family member’s job/companies, Church, etc.
  • Arrange campus visits to your top choice schools.
  • Enroll in a summer enrichment program such as camps or events that include information or activities regarding the college admission process.
  • Continue conversations with family members about a financial savings plan for college. Possibly get a summer job in order to begin saving for college.
  • Meet and get acquainted with your high school counselor. Let them know what your interests are for future careers and learn what type of classes and areas of study are important in order to pursue your career goals.
  • Seek information about college nights or events when college representatives will visit your school. Collect information about the colleges of interest to you.
  • Research different college/university websites for an overview of the school regarding types of majors, location, social aspects and other areas that you feel are important when choosing a college—information can be found in your high school counselor’s office.
  • Take challenging classes that you can handle. (Pre-Advanced Placement/Advanced Placement/Honors/International Baccalaureate) Seek tutorial sessions when needed.
  • Establish good study habits and stay focused on school work, homework and school projects.
    Study Skills for High School Students
  • Seek summer enrichment programs that are college-focused or that offer activities and events related to college information and preparedness.
    Summer Camps
  • Talk with family members about financial savings plan for college.
    10 Ways to Save for College
  • Volunteer in your community.
  • Get involved in school activities that interest you.